Z Orthop Unfall
DOI: 10.1055/a-0929-7820
Original Article/Originalarbeit
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

S100B Serum Level is Independent of Moderate Alcohol Intoxication

Article in several languages: English | deutsch
Laura Emine Stollhof
1  Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie, BG Unfallklinik Tübingen
,
Udo Obertacke
2  Orthopädisch-Unfallchirurgisches Zentrum, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultät Mannheim der Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg
,
David Eschmann
2  Orthopädisch-Unfallchirurgisches Zentrum, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultät Mannheim der Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg
,
Sandra Proba
2  Orthopädisch-Unfallchirurgisches Zentrum, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultät Mannheim der Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg
,
Miriam Bühler
2  Orthopädisch-Unfallchirurgisches Zentrum, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultät Mannheim der Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg
,
Michael Neumeier
3  Institut für Klinische Chemie, Universität Mannheim
,
Frederic Bludau
2  Orthopädisch-Unfallchirurgisches Zentrum, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultät Mannheim der Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
18 September 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective In Germany, among patients with minor head injury (MHI), the incidence of coexisting alcohol intoxication is indicated up to 50%. The neurological symptoms of patients with MHI may be caused or altered by alcohol intoxication, this could mislead to further, potential harmful, diagnostic steps or to misinterpretation of the symptoms and to non-execution of necessary treatments. In order to decide which patients need further diagnostics by CCT, S100B has been proposed as a potential selection criterion. On the other hand, studies have hypothesized that alcohol intoxication may lead to elevated S100B serum levels. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the relationship between the blood ethyl alcohol concentration and the S100B serum concentration in an experimental setting in young human adult volunteers.

Methods In a cohort of 58 healthy volunteers, serum S100B concentration and blood ethyl alcohol concentration were measured before and after liberately drinking alcohol. The study was approved by the local Ethics Committee of the Medical Faculty Mannheim (Ethics Committee II, AZ 2012-272 N-MA). Instantaneous analysis of the samples was carried out using state-of-the art automated measuring systems. (Analyzer Cobas e411, Roche and Analyzer Dimension Vista 1500, Siemens).

Results After drinking, alcohol levels ranged from 0,23 to 1,92 g/l. The S100B value ranged from to 0,021 to 0,115 µg/l after alcohol consumption (S100B standard value < 0,11 µg/l). By calculating the Pearson correlation of empirical correlation after drinking alcohol with r = 0.01181, a correlation between serum S100B concentration and ethyl alcohol concentration is not probable. The S100B concentrations were independent on the alcohol intake in low to medium alcohol levels.

Conclusion A relevant alcohol blood concentration (~ 1 g/l), in otherwise healthy volunteers, does not affect the serum concentration of S100B. S100B may be a useful brain injury marker in low to moderate drunken patients.