CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Sports Med Int Open 2020; 4(01): E1-E7
DOI: 10.1055/a-1089-4957
Training & Testing
Eigentümer und Copyright ©Georg Thieme Verlag KG 2020

Establishing Reference Cardiorespiratory Fitness Parameters in Alzheimer’s Disease

Dereck Salisbury
1  School of Nursing, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, United States
,
Fang Yu
1  School of Nursing, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, United States
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Publikationsverlauf

06. August 2019
23. Dezember 2019

28. Dezember 2019

Publikationsdatum:
30. Januar 2020 (online)

  

Abstract

Evidence is growing for aerobic exercise training as a viable means to attenuate cognitive losses associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The mechanism of action for aerobic exercise’s cognitive benefits is likely enhanced cardiorespiratory fitness and its response to incremental aerobic exercise have been incompletely evaluated in Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of this analysis was to establish cardiorespiratory fitness reference values in older adults with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease using a cardiopulmonary graded exercise testing. Ninety-seven community-dwelling older adults with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease underwent a symptom limited cardiopulmonary graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Differences between sexes and between Alzheimer’s disease participants with and without diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases were assessed by independent T-tests. Peak oxygen consumption was 10–20% lower than those achieved by similar clinical populations on treadmill tests. As expected, males produced significantly higher peak oxygen consumption compared to females (p =0 .02). However, the presence of concurrent cardiovascular disease did not result in statistically significant lower peak oxygen consumption compared to those without cardiovascular disease. These data provide a frame of reference for metabolic, cardiovascular, and ventilatory function during cardiopulmonary graded exercise testing performed on cycle ergometer in older adults with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease.