Int J Sports Med 2021; 42(06): 494-496
DOI: 10.1055/a-1342-7708
Review

Are We Exploring the Potential Role of Specialized Techniques in Muscle Hypertrophy?

1  Metabolism, Nutrition and Exercise Laboratory, Physical Education and Sport Center, Londrina State University, Londrina, Brazil
,
1  Metabolism, Nutrition and Exercise Laboratory, Physical Education and Sport Center, Londrina State University, Londrina, Brazil
,
1  Metabolism, Nutrition and Exercise Laboratory, Physical Education and Sport Center, Londrina State University, Londrina, Brazil
,
Andreo Fernando Aguiar
2  University of Northern Paraná, Londrina, PR, Brazil
,
Belmiro F. de Salles
3  Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
,
Alex Silva Ribeiro
1  Metabolism, Nutrition and Exercise Laboratory, Physical Education and Sport Center, Londrina State University, Londrina, Brazil
2  University of Northern Paraná, Londrina, PR, Brazil
› Author Affiliations
Funding: No external sources of funding were used in the preparation of this article.

Abstract

Specialized resistance training techniques (e.g., drop-set, rest-pause) are commonly used by well-trained subjects for maximizing muscle hypertrophy. Most of these techniques were designed to allow a greater training volume (i.e., total repetitions×load), due to the supposition that it elicits greater muscle mass gains. However, many studies that compared the traditional resistance training configuration with specialized techniques seek to equalize the volume between groups, making it difficult to determine the inherent hypertrophic potential of these advanced strategies, as well as, this equalization restricts part of the practical extrapolation on these findings. In this scenario, the objectives of this manuscript were 1) to present the nuance of the evidence that deals with the effectiveness of these specialized resistance training techniques and — primarily — to 2) propose possible ways to explore the hypertrophic potential of such strategies with greater ecological validity without losing the methodological rigor of controlling possible intervening variables; and thus, contributing to increasing the applicability of the findings and improving the effectiveness of hypertrophy-oriented resistance training programs.



Publication History

Received: 03 August 2020

Accepted: 15 December 2020

Publication Date:
27 January 2021 (online)

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