Semin Liver Dis 2009; 29(2): 200-210
DOI: 10.1055/s-0029-1214375
© Thieme Medical Publishers

Similarities and Differences in the Pathogenesis of Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

Wing-Kin Syn1 , Vanessa Teaberry3 , Steve S. Choi1 , 2 , Anna Mae Diehl1
  • 1Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
  • 2Section of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Durham Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
  • 3Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
22 April 2009 (online)

ABSTRACT

Subpopulations of individuals with alcohol-induced fatty livers and nonalcoholic steatosis develop steatohepatitis. Steatohepatitis is defined histologically: increased numbers of injured and dying hepatocytes distinguish this condition from simple steatosis. The increased hepatocyte death is generally accompanied by hepatic accumulation of inflammatory cells and sometimes increases in myofibroblastic cells, leading to hepatic fibrosis and eventually, cirrhosis. The purpose of this review is to summarize similarities and differences in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis in alcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

REFERENCES

Anna Mae Diehl, M.D. 

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Genome Sciences Research Building-1

595 LaSalle Street, Suite 1073, DUMC 3256, Durham, NC 27710

Email: annamae.diehl@duke.edu