Semin Liver Dis 2009; 29(2): 211-221
DOI: 10.1055/s-0029-1214376
© Thieme Medical Publishers

Alcohol and Liver Fibrosis

Francisco Javier Cubero1 [*] , Raquel Urtasun1 [*] , Natalia Nieto1
  • 1Department of Medicine, Division of Liver Diseases, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
22 April 2009 (online)

ABSTRACT

Alcoholic liver disease involves significant crosstalk among intracellular signaling events in the liver. Overall, inflammatory and innate immune responses in Kupffer cells due to elevated gut-derived plasma endotoxin levels, increased reactive oxygen species-induced damage, and profibrogenic factors such as acetaldehyde or lipid peroxidation products contribute to activation of hepatic stellate cells, the key cell type involved in liver fibrosis. Using in vitro and in vivo approaches, there has been great progress in our understanding of the mechanisms leading to liver fibrosis: potential biomarkers of fibrosis have been identified, and several candidate targets for antifibrotic drugs have been elucidated.

REFERENCES

0 Both authors contributed equally to this review.

Natalia Nieto, Ph.D. 

Department of Medicine, Division of Liver Diseases, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Box 1123, 1425 Madison Avenue

Room 11-76, New York, NY 10029

Email: natalia.nieto@mssm.edu