J Knee Surg 2012; 25(01): 065-070
DOI: 10.1055/s-0031-1299667
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients 40 Years and Younger

Michael A. Mont
1  Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopaedics, Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Baltimore, Maryland
,
Siraj A. Sayeed
1  Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopaedics, Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Baltimore, Maryland
,
Obi Osuji
2  Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Howard University, Washington, District of Columbia
,
Aaron J. Johnson
1  Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopaedics, Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Baltimore, Maryland
,
Qais Naziri
1  Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopaedics, Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Baltimore, Maryland
,
Ronald E. Delanois
1  Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopaedics, Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Baltimore, Maryland
,
Peter M. Bonutti
3  Department of Orthopaedics, Bonutti Clinic, Effingtham, Illinois
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

26 July 2011

21 August 2011

Publication Date:
12 April 2012 (online)

Abstract

Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a procedure with excellent clinical results in older patients with a primary diagnosis of osteoarthritis. Many younger patients undergo unicompartmental or high tibial osteotomy rather than TKA, but are not always good candidates for these joint-preserving procedures. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of patients 40 years of age and under who underwent TKA. We identified 33 patients (38 knees) who were 40 years of age or less at the time of surgery. These patients had a mean age of 36 years (range, 23 to 40 years), and were followed for a mean of 49 months (range, 16 to 101 months). The survival rate in the study cohort was 97%. For the young patient who is not a candidate for other types of joint preserving procedures, in the senior authors' experience total knee arthroplasties have performed well.