Drug Res (Stuttg) 2013; 63(01): 7-12
DOI: 10.1055/s-0032-1331165
Original Article
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Preparation and Characterization of Chitosan/β-cyclodextrin Nanoparticles Containing Plasmid DNA Encoding Interleukin-12

M. Nahaei
1   Hematology and Oncology Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
,
H. Valizadeh
2   Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
,
B. Baradaran
3   Immunology Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
,
M. R. Nahaei
4   Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
,
D. Asgari
2   Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
,
S. Hallaj-Nezhadi
1   Hematology and Oncology Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
,
S. Dastmalchi
5   Biotechnology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
,
F. Lotfipour
1   Hematology and Oncology Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
› Institutsangaben
Weitere Informationen

Publikationsverlauf

received 06. Juni 2012

accepted 30. Oktober 2012

Publikationsdatum:
08. Januar 2013 (online)

Abstract

Background:

Interleukin-12 (IL-12) as a cytokine has been proved to possess antitumor effects via stimulating the immune system. Non-viral gene delivery systems offer several advantages, including easiness in production, low cost, safety; low immunogenicity and can carry higher amounts of genetic material without limitation on their sizes.

Methods:

pUMVC3-hIL12 loaded Low Molecular Weight chitosan/β-cyclodextrin (LMW CS/CD) nanoparticles were prepared using ionotropic gelation method and characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, morphology, loading efficiency and cytotoxicity against the CT-26 colon carcinoma cell line.

Results:

All prepared particles were spherical in shape and nano-sized (171.3±2.165 nm, PdI: 0.231±0.014) and exhibited a positive zeta potential (34.3±1.55). The nanoparticles demonstrated good DNA encapsulation efficiencies (83.315%±2.067). Prepared pUMVC3-hIL12 loaded LMW CS/CD nanoparticles showed no cell toxicity in murine CT-26 colon carcinoma cells. At the concentration of 0.1 µg/ml of nanoparticles, the transfection ability was obviously higher than that of the naked DNA.

Conclusion:

LMW CS/CD-plasmid DNA nanoparticles encoding IL-12 prepared using ionotropic gelation method with no toxic effect on the tested cells can be considered as a basis for further gene delivery studies both in vitro and in vivo to enhance the expression of IL-12.

 
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