Neuropediatrics 2013; 44(05): 252-256
DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1347934
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Characteristic Features of Migraine in Schoolchildren and Adolescents and Its Relationship with Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

Emel Torun
1  Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Esra Gursoy
2  Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Serhat Guler
3  Department of Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Mehmet Kolukisa
2  Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Burak Tatli
3  Department of Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

17 November 2012

02 April 2013

Publication Date:
14 June 2013 (online)

Abstract

Objective The studies about autonomic nervous system (ANS) disorders in adult migraineurs show conflicting results with limited data on ANS function in childhood and adolescence. This study aimed to investigate ANS function in childhood migraine.

Patients and Methods The migraine and control groups consisted of 35 migraineurs and 30 healthy children, respectively. In both groups, heart rate interval variation (RRIV) and sympathetic skin response (SSR) were used as noninvasive ANS function tests.

Results No significant differences in age and gender distribution were found between the study and control groups. A family history of migraine was seen in 65% patients in the study group and 20% in the control group. The duration, quality, frequency, and location of pain were variable; only 14.1% of the patients had sensory and visual aural symptoms. There was neither a significant difference in RRIV and SSR between migraine and control groups (p > 0.05) nor in heart rate responses to deep breathing (p = 0.83). The mean amplitude of SSR in children with migraine was smaller than that in the control group, but it did not reach a level of statistical significance.

Conclusions In children with migraine, our results demonstrate no abnormal ANS function related to either the sympathetic or the parasympathetic nervous system.