Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2017; 65(04): 286-291
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1582258
Original Cardiovascular
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Impact of Gender on Outcome in Octogenarians after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

Rouven Berndt
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Bernd Panholzer
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Katharina Huenges
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Jill Jussli-Melchers
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Felix Schoeneich
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Christine Friedrich
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Grischa Hoffmann
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Jochen Cremer
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Assad Haneya
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

28 September 2015

03 March 2016

Publication Date:
25 April 2016 (online)

Abstract

Background Increasing life expectancy makes cardiac surgery in octogenarians not very uncommon. In this study, the impact of gender on outcome of octogenarians after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) was assessed.

Materials and Methods We retrospectively studied 485 octogenarians (176 females: mean age 82.4 ± 2.2 years vs. 306 males: mean age 82.2 ± 2.4 years) who underwent isolated CABG using extracorporeal circulation between January 2005 and December 2012.

Results No significant differences were noted between both gender groups with regard to preoperative risk factors. At baseline, the groups differed significantly with respect to mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) (women: 22.3 ± 17.4% vs. men: 17.5 ± 13.3%; p < 0.001). Likewise, EuroSCORE II differs significantly between women and men in our cohort (women: 16.7 ± 11.9% vs. men: 13.9 ± 10.7%; p = 0.008). Intraoperatively, the number of distal anastomoses (3.1 ± 0.9 vs. 3.2 ± 0.8), the mean extracorporeal circulation time (99 ± 31 vs. 102 ± 29 minutes), and the mean aortic cross-clamp time (63 ± 31 vs. 60 ± 19 minutes) were similar in both groups. Postoperatively, no significant differences in complications and major morbidity were observed between the groups. The 30-day mortality (women 8.0 vs. men 9.7%; p = 0.62) were without statistical significance between the groups.

Conclusion Outcome of octogenarians after CABG resulted in acceptable mortality. Female gender was not associated with increased risks for morbidity and mortality after surgery. Satisfactory outcomes encourage the offering of surgery in octogenarians.