Am J Perinatol 2017; 34(01): 74-79
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1584274
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Preventing Maternal Morbidity from Obstetric Hemorrhage: Implications of a Provider Training Initiative

Michelle A. Kominiarek
1  Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
,
Shirley Scott
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
,
Abigail R. Koch
3  Center for Research on Women and Gender, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
,
Maripat Zeschke
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
,
Yvette Cordova
1  Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
,
Samadh F. Ravangard
1  Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
,
Deborah Schy
4  Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, Park Ridge, Illinois
,
Stacie E. Geller
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
3  Center for Research on Women and Gender, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
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Publikationsverlauf

15. Dezember 2015

16. April 2016

Publikationsdatum:
30. Mai 2016 (online)

Abstract

Objective The objective of this study was to compare severe morbidity due to obstetrical hemorrhage and its potential preventability before and after a mandated provider training initiative on obstetric hemorrhage.

Study Design Cases of severe morbidity due to obstetric hemorrhage during 2006 (n = 64 before training initiative) and 2010 (n = 71 after training initiative) were identified by a two-factor scoring system of intensive care unit admission and/or transfusion of ≥ 3 units of blood products and reviewed by an expert panel. Preventable factors were categorized as provider, system, and/or patient related.

Results Potential preventability did not differ between 2006 and 2010, p = 0.19. Provider factors remained the most common preventable factor (88.2% in 2006 vs. 97.4% in 2010, p = 0.18), but the distribution in types of preventable factors improved over time for delay or failure in assessment (20.6 vs. 0%, p < 0.01) and delay or inappropriate treatment (76.5 vs. 39.5%, p < 0.01). System factors also differed (32.4 vs. 7.9%, p = 0.015) with a notable decline in factors related to policies and procedures (26.5 vs. 2.6%, p < 0.01) between 2006 and 2010.

Conclusion We found significant improvement in provider assessment and treatment of obstetric hemorrhage and a significant reduction in preventable factors related to policies and procedures after the training initiative.

Note

An abstract from this study was presented in poster format at the Central Association for Obstetricians and Gynecologists in Charleston, South Carolina, October 21–24, 2015.


Supplementary Material