Synlett 2017; 28(18): 2465-2467
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1588504
cluster
© Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York

Tetrabutylammonium Bifluoride as an Efficient Activating Agent for Copper-Catalyzed Vinylsilane Cross-Coupling Reactions

Loïc Cornelissen, Audric Nagy, Tom Leyssens, Olivier Riant*
  • Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Molecules, Solids and Reactivity (IMCN/MOST) – Université Catholique de Louvain, Place Louis Pasteur 1, bte L4.01.02, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium   Email: olivier.riant@uclouvain.be
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 08 May 2017

Accepted after revision: 22 June 2017

Publication Date:
25 August 2017 (eFirst)

Published as part of the Cluster Silicon in Synthesis and Catalysis

Abstract

Vinylsilanes are versatile and efficient nucleophiles in cross-coupling reactions. Herein is described the use of tetrabutylammonium bifluoride as a mild, cheap and scalable activating agent in several copper-catalyzed vinylsilane cross-couplings.

Supporting Information

 
  • References and Notes

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