Synlett 2017; 28(20): 2851-2854
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1588540
letter
© Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York

Catalytic Deuteration of Aldehydes with D2O

Eric S. Isbrandt, Jaya Kishore Vandavasi, Wanying Zhang, Mohammad P. Jamshidi, Stephen G. Newman*
  • Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation, Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5, Canada   Email: stephen.newman@uottawa.ca
Financial support for this work was provided by the University of Ottawa, the National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the Canada Research Chair program. The Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation are thanked for essential infrastructure. E.I. thanks NSERC and the Government of Ontario for USRA and OGS scholarships, respectively.
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 19 June 2017

Accepted after revision: 17 July 2017

Publication Date:
21 August 2017 (eFirst)

Dedicated to Professor Victor Snieckus on the occasion of his 80th birthday

Abstract

A procedure is presented that enables the direct deuteration of the formyl C–H bond of aldehydes using D2O as the deuterium source and commercially available RuHCl(CO)(PPh3)3 as the catalyst. Up to 84% deuterium incorporation can be achieved in a single experiment. Multiple iterations can be carried out to further increase the deuteration.

Supporting Information

 
  • References and Notes

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