Pneumologie 2017; 71(S 01): S1-S125
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1598478
Posterbegehung – Sektion Rehabilitation, Prävention und Tabakkontrolle
Neues zu Messinstrumenten und Trainingsmodalitäten in der Rehabilitation – Marc Spielmanns/Leverkusen, Andreas Rembert Koczulla/Marburg
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Effects of a 6 week whole-body vibration training (WBVT) in stable COPD patients: a randomized clinical trial

M Jimenez Siebert
1  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg
,
T Böselt
1  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg
,
T Greulich
1  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg
,
P Alter
1  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg
,
FJF Herth
2  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg; Pulmonology, Thoraxklinik Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg
,
N Kahn
2  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg; Pulmonology, Thoraxklinik Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg
,
F Bornitz
2  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg; Pulmonology, Thoraxklinik Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg
,
C Vogelmeier
1  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg
,
C Nell
1  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg
,
CJ Kähler
3  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg; Pulmonology, Fachkliniken Wangen
,
S Hummler
2  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg; Pulmonology, Thoraxklinik Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg
,
AR Koczulla
1  Pulmonology, Institute for Internal Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
23 February 2017 (online)

 

Introduction:

Abstention from exercise results in reduced mobility, loss of cardiopulmonary capacity and social isolation.

Aims and objectives:

WBVT has been proven as a safe training method, which produces benefits regarding exercise capacity, dyspnoea and health-related quality of life (Greulich, T., et al. BMC Pulm Med, 2014. 14: p. 60). We aimed to evaluate whether WBVT has an impact on lung function, physical capacity and diaphragmatic movement and respiratory muscle strength.

Methods:

Between May and Dec 2015, 21 stable patients (I-IV (FEV1 (SG) 51.9 ± 22% (TG) 57.1 ± 20.8%) were randomized (1:1) to receive sham training (SG) at 5 Hz or WBVT (TG) (starting with 14 Hz up to 28 Hz). Physical endurance (6 Minute Walk Test, Chair Rising Test), lung function and diaphragmatic parameters (P0.1, PImax, diaphragm ultrasound), quality of life (SF-12, PHQ-9) and symptoms (SGRQ, CAT, mMRC) were measured at the time of enrolment (T0), after completing the training period (T1) and 6 weeks after having completed the training (T2).

Results:

The first centre analysis showed an improvement (1.68 ± 2.34 mm; p < 0,05) of diaphragm muscle thickness (diaphragm ultrasound measurement) after the training period (TG = T0: 6.3 ± 1.8; T1: 7.6 ± 1.3; T2: 5.5 ± 1.3 mm/SG = T0: 5.1 ± 0.8; T1: 6.15 ± 1.9; T2: 6.1 ± 2.6 mm). 6 weeks later, a decrease of thickness was found (-1.9 ± 2.2 mm; p < 0.05). We saw no significant differences between both groups in the functional respiratory measurements, especially PImax.

Conclusion:

The first results after TG-WBVT showed promising effects in diaphragm muscle increase. No change in respiratory muscle strength was found which might be due to the short training episode. Data will be updated after inclusion of the missing centre data.