Synlett 2019; 30(07): 827-832
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1611744
letter
© Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York

Synthesis and Characterization of Acridinium Dyes for Photoredox Catalysis

Alexander R. White
,
Leifeng Wang
,
David A. Nicewicz*
Department of Chemistry, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27599-3290, USA   eMail: [email protected]
› Institutsangaben
This project was supported by Award No. R01 GM098340 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and a Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award (D.A.N.). L.W. was supported by the International Postdoctoral Exchange Fellowship Program. Photophysical measurements were performed in the UNC-ERFC Instrumentation Facility established by the UNC-EFRC (Center for Solar Fuels, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001011).
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Publikationsverlauf

Received: 21. Januar 2019

Accepted after revision: 12. Februar 2019

Publikationsdatum:
12. März 2019 (online)


Abstract

Photoredox catalysis is a rapidly evolving platform for synthetic methods development. The prominent use of acridinium salts as a sustainable option for photoredox catalysts has driven the development of more robust and synthetically useful versions based on this scaffold. However, more complicated syntheses, increased cost, and limited commercial availability have hindered the adoption of these catalysts by the greater synthetic community. By utilizing the direct conversion of a xanthylium salt into the corresponding acridinium as the key transformation, we present an efficient and scalable preparation of the most synthetically useful acridinium reported to date. This divergent strategy also enabled the preparation of a suite of novel acridinium dyes, allowing for a systematic investigation of substitution effects on their photophysical properties.

Supporting Information

 
  • References and Notes


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