Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd 2018; 78(10): 111
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1671081
Poster
Donnerstag, 01.11.2018
Operative Gynäkologie, Urogynäkologie I
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

The glycerin-based cadaver preservation – A technique that enables training of laparoscopic surgery on human body donor

J Ackermann
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Kiel, Deutschland
,
H Hagedorn
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Kiel, Deutschland
,
N Maass
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Kiel, Deutschland
,
T Wedel
2  Anatomisches Institut der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Deutschland
,
I Alkatout
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Kiel, Deutschland
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
20 September 2018 (online)

 

Introduction:

The study of human anatomy on corpses from body donors plays an essential role in the training of physicians and the development of new surgical techniques. Especially in laparoscopic surgery, the method of cadaver preservation is crucial for an optimal training of skills.

Materials and methods:

The glycerin-based cadaver preservation enables embalming of human body donor by a solution of ethanol and glycerol. The quality of preservation and the feasibility of training of laparoscopy on human body donors was evaluated in an international interdisciplinary course for laparoscopic surgery.

Results:

A total of 73 participants took part in our advanced laparoscopy courses on human body donors (n = 20). The quality of corpse fixation and tissue composition was assessed by the majority of participants as very high (71,2%, n = 52) or high (27,4%, n = 20). Especially the training of laparoscopic dissection showed a strong correlation (r = 0,77, p < 0,001, n = 53) with the overall success of the training. We could show the feasibility of several laparoscopic applications like the creation of a pneumoperitoneum, use of electric surgery and realistic tissue dissection comparable to surgery in living patients.

Conclusion:

With the new method of glycerin-based cadaver preservation laparoscopy on human body donor is possible in a realistic and practical way. The application of this method in advanced laparoscopic training courses seems to be a promising improvement for surgical education. In addition, it could be an encouraging solution to ethical and patient safety concerns if integrated into the life demonstrations of surgery instead of real patients.