The Journal of Hip Surgery 2019; 03(04): 181-185
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1696665
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

The Natural History of the Anteriorly Dislocated Total Hip Arthroplasty

Nicky L. Leung
1  Department of Orthopedic Surgical Residency, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
,
Carl T. Talmo
2  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, New England Baptist Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
,
Olivia J. Bono
2  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, New England Baptist Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
,
Charles E. Craven Jr.
2  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, New England Baptist Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
,
Nader A. Bakhos
2  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, New England Baptist Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
,
James V. Bono
2  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, New England Baptist Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
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Publikationsverlauf

18. Juni 2019

24. Juli 2019

Publikationsdatum:
03. September 2019 (online)

Abstract

Dislocation with instability is one of the most frequent causes of early failure and subsequent revision following primary total hip arthroplasty. However, anterior hip dislocation has been shown to be a relatively infrequent event and there are little data on outcomes of patients with these types of dislocation. The purpose of the current study was to assess the functional outcomes and survival of the prosthetic hip in patients who have sustained an anterior dislocation and to compare these results with a similar cohort of patients who have sustained a posterior dislocation. The charts and radiographs of patients sustaining an anterior dislocation following primary total hip arthroplasty were reviewed at an average of 7 years after the index procedure. Redislocation rate, revision status, and function as assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index of Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) were examined. These were compared with an age- and gender-matched cohort of patients who had sustained a posterior dislocation. Patients sustaining an anterior dislocation were found to have a mean acetabular anteversion of 36 degrees, compared with 25.6 degrees in patients who had sustained a posterior dislocation. However, this did not result in any difference in revision rate or WOMAC score at the time of follow-up. The current evidence shows us that a single-posterior dislocation does not preclude a satisfactory long-term outcome. Based on their data, the authors feel it would be appropriate to counsel patients that a single-anterior dislocation also does not preclude a satisfactory outcome.