Semin Musculoskelet Radiol 2019; 23(06): 609-620
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697936
Review Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Weight-bearing MRI of the Lumbar Spine: Technical Aspects

Cecilie Lerche Nordberg
1  Department of Rheumatology, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark
2  Department of Radiology, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark
,
1  Department of Rheumatology, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark
,
Janus Damm Nybing
2  Department of Radiology, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark
,
2  Department of Radiology, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark
,
Henning Bliddal
1  Department of Rheumatology, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark
,
3  Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Sha Tin, Hong Kong
,
Gilles Fournier
4  Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark
,
Giuseppe Guglielmi
5  Department of Radiology, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy
,
2  Department of Radiology, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark
› Author Affiliations
Funding Sources Cecilie Lerche Nordberg: Oak Foundation: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100001275, Frederiksberg and Bispebjerg Hospital. Bjarke Brandt Hansen: Gigtforeningen, http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100008368.
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
19 November 2019 (online)

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has an established role in the assessment of degenerative musculoskeletal conditions. However, conventional supine MRI findings often correlate poorly with clinical findings. Some patients experience accentuated back pain in the weight-bearing position. Therefore, supine MRI may underestimate the severity of degenerative spine findings. To try and improve the clinical validity of spine imaging, axial loading devices have been used with conventional supine MR imaging to simulate loading of the upright spine. More recently, upright weight-bearing MRI systems (0.25–0.6 T) were introduced, allowing images to be obtained in the standing or seated weight-bearing position and even during upright flexion or extension, rotation, or bending. Some scanners even enable capturing of real-time spinal movement. This review addresses the technical aspects and potential challenges of weight-bearing MRI, both in clinical practice and research.

Supplementary Material