J Pediatr Intensive Care 2020; 09(01): 060-063
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697978
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

A 13-Year-Old Boy Who Has Kawasaki Disease Shock Syndrome Presents with Parotitis

Yilmaz Yozgat
1  Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Selcuk Uzuner
2  Department of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Aysegul Dogan Demir
2  Department of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Mustafa Ogur
2  Department of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Can Yilmaz Yozgat
3  Faculty of Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Ozden Turel
4  Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
› Author Affiliations
Funding This research received no specific grant from any funding agency or commercial or not-for-profit sectors.
Further Information

Publication History

13 May 2019

30 August 2019

Publication Date:
09 October 2019 (online)

Abstract

We report a 13-year-old boy who (initially) had symptoms of toxic shock-like syndrome and mumps. Then, the patient was hospitalized in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) because of his ongoing hemodynamic instability (low blood pressure of 70/30 mm Hg and capillary refill time of > 4 seconds). During his stay in the PICU, the patient was treated with fluid resuscitation and vasoactive infusion and at the same time was diagnosed with Kawasaki disease shock syndrome (KDSS), when giant right coronary artery aneurysms were detected on echocardiographic examination. This case illustrates the risk of KDSS in patient who carries both parotitis and toxic shock-like syndrome. The clinicians should be cautious about detecting any types of coronary artery aneurysms in such patients. This is the first case of KDSS associated with parotitis reported in the literature.

Ethical Approval

This case report does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors. Institutional Review Board approval was not required for this case report.


Authors' Contributions

All authors participated in creating the content of the case report, editing, and providing final approval for submission. No undisclosed authors contributed to the case report.