J Pediatr Neurol
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698428
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Thoracic Endodermal Sinus Tumor with Root Compression Mimicking Guillain–Barre Syndrome in Clinical Presentation, CSF Studies, and EMG/NCV Findings

Gal Barbut
1  Department of Pediatrics, Infants and Children's Hospital of Brooklyn, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, United States
,
Yuri Brosgol
1  Department of Pediatrics, Infants and Children's Hospital of Brooklyn, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, United States
2  Division of Child Neurology, Infants and Children's Hospital of Brooklyn, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, United States
,
Mahmut Celiker
1  Department of Pediatrics, Infants and Children's Hospital of Brooklyn, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, United States
3  Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Infants and Children's Hospital of Brooklyn, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, United States
,
Evan G. Stein
4  Department of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Infants and Children's Hospital of Brooklyn, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, United States
,
Gary N. McAbee
1  Department of Pediatrics, Infants and Children's Hospital of Brooklyn, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, United States
2  Division of Child Neurology, Infants and Children's Hospital of Brooklyn, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

21 December 2018

18 June 2019

Publication Date:
18 October 2019 (online)

Abstract

A 2-year-old boy who presented with clinical, cerebrospinal fluid, and electrophysiological findings consistent with Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS) was found to have a thoracic spinal cord mass due to a yolk sac tumor. On examination, he had an absent anal wink and flaccid anal ring which is atypical for GBS. This case demonstrates the need for a thorough physical examination on presentation of a child with a clinical and laboratory presentation of GBS and highlights the importance of prompt imaging studies when clinical suspicion arises because of atypical clinical signs, such as absent anal wink or low rectal tone.

Authors' Contribution

G.B. authored the first draft of the manuscript and contributed to the literature review of the article. G.N.M., Y.B., M.C., and E.G.S. participated in the care of the patient and contributed to the literature review and text of the article.