J Reconstr Microsurg 2020; 36(06): 458-465
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1703016
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Effect of Degree of Arterial Inflow on a Functioning Free Muscle Transplantation in a Rat Gracilis Model

1  Division of Reconstructive Microsurgery, Department of Plastic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
,
Nicholas Thu Khoa Do
1  Division of Reconstructive Microsurgery, Department of Plastic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
,
Yen-Lin Huang
2  Department of Anatomic Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
,
Johnny Chuieng-Yi Lu
1  Division of Reconstructive Microsurgery, Department of Plastic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
,
Tommy Nai-Jen Chang
1  Division of Reconstructive Microsurgery, Department of Plastic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
,
David Chwei-Chin Chuang
1  Division of Reconstructive Microsurgery, Department of Plastic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
› Author Affiliations
Funding This study was supported by the grant of the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (CMRPG3F2251).
Further Information

Publication History

23 September 2019

20 January 2020

Publication Date:
23 March 2020 (online)

Abstract

Background Various surgical effects have previously been studied in an attempt to improve the functional outcome of the functioning free muscle transplantation (FFMT). However, the effect of the recipient arterial inflow on the FFMT has remained uninvestigated. This study was to investigate whether or not high flow versus low flow will affect the functional outcome of FFMT.

Methods Rat's left gracilis FFMT model was devised and the nutrient arterial inflow was modified. Twenty-four Lewis rats were divided evenly into relatively high (0.071 mL/min) and relatively low (0.031 mL/min) blood flow groups (p < 0.001). The unoperated right sides served as the controls. Cases resulting in poor function were additionally grouped as functional failure group for comparison. Regular swimming exercise was implemented at 1 month postoperatively for 3 months. Gracilis muscle functions were then evaluated.

Results Compared groups were: control (n = 13), low blood flow (n = 10), high blood flow (n = 8), and functional failure (n = 5). The control group showed superior functional results over the experimental groups (p < 0.0001). In the experimental group, successful group showed superior over the poor function group (p < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference between the high- and low-flow groups.

Conclusion This is the first study to evaluate the effect of arterial inflow on the FFMT. The rate of blood flow (relatively high vs. low) has little effect on the functional outcome of transferred muscle. Survival of FFMT is the major concern while performing FFMT surgery. Arterial inflow while choosing the recipient artery is not the factor for consideration.

Note

This study was presented at the presented at the Asian Pacific Federation of Societies for Reconstructive Microsurgery (APFSRM) 2018 in Antalya, Turkey.