Am J Perinatol
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1713851
SMFM Fellowship Series Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Clinical Implications of SARS-CoV-2 Infection in the Viable Preterm Period

1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, North Shore University Hospital–Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York
,
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Southside Hospital–Northwell Health, Bay Shore, New York
,
Burton Rochelson
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, North Shore University Hospital–Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York
,
Michael Nimaroff
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, North Shore University Hospital–Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York
,
Weiwei Shan
3  Biostatistics Unit, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York
,
4  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lenox Hill Hospital–Northwell Health, New York
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

28 May 2020

03 June 2020

Publication Date:
02 July 2020 (online)

Abstract

Objective This study aimed to determine the rate of preterm birth (PTB) during hospitalization among women diagnosed with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) between 23 and 37 weeks of gestation and whether this rate differs by gestational age at diagnosis of infection.

Study Design Retrospective, cross-sectional study of all women diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection between 23 and 37 weeks of gestation within a large integrated health system from March 13 to April 24, 2020. Cases with severe fetal structural malformations detected prior to infection were excluded. Women were stratified into two groups based on gestational age at diagnosis: early preterm (230/7 to 336/7 weeks) versus late preterm (34 to 366/7 weeks). We compared the rate of PTB during hospitalization with infection between the two groups. Statistical analysis included use of Wilcoxon rank sum and Fisher exact tests, as well as a multivariable logistic regression. Statistical significance was defined as a p-value <0.05.

Results Of the 65 patients included, 36 (53.7%) were diagnosed in the early preterm period and 29 (46.3%) were diagnosed in the late preterm period. Baseline demographics were similar between groups. The rate of PTB during hospitalization with infection was significantly lower among women diagnosed in the early preterm period compared with late preterm (7/36 [19.4%] vs. 18/29 [62%], p-value = 0.001). Of the 25 patients who delivered during hospitalization with infection, the majority were indicated deliveries (64%, 16/25). There were no deliveries <33 weeks of gestation for worsening coronavirus disease 2019 and severity of disease did not alter the likelihood of delivery during hospitalization with SARS-CoV-2 infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.24–1.59). Increased maternal age was associated with a lower likelihood of delivery during hospitalization with SARS-CoV-2 infection (aOR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.58–0.96), while later gestational age at diagnosis of infection was associated with a higher likelihood of delivery during hospitalization (aOR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1.67–8.09).

Conclusion The likelihood of PTB during hospitalization with SARS-CoV-2 infection is significantly lower among women diagnosed in the early preterm period compared with late preterm. Most women with SARS-CoV-2 infection in the early preterm period recovered and were discharged home. The majority of PTB were indicated and not due to spontaneous preterm labor.

Key Points

  • Preterm delivery is less likely among women diagnosed in the early preterm compared with late preterm.

  • Most women infected in the early preterm period recovered and were discharged home undelivered.

  • The majority of preterm birth were indicated and not due to spontaneous preterm labor.