J Wrist Surg 2021; 10(03): 262-267
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1721854
Emerging Technologies and New Technological Concepts

Preliminary Report of Arthroscopically Assisted Sauvé–Kapandji Procedure for Distal Radioulnar Joint Arthritis

Yukio Abe
1   Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Saiseikai Shimonoseki General Hospital, Shimonoseki, Japan
,
Youhei Takahashi
1   Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Saiseikai Shimonoseki General Hospital, Shimonoseki, Japan
,
Kenzo Fujii
1   Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Saiseikai Shimonoseki General Hospital, Shimonoseki, Japan
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Background The arthroscopically assisted Sauvé–Kapandji (S-K) procedure has been described as a safe and promising technique for distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) arthrodesis. Our purpose was to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the arthroscopically assisted S-K procedure.

Methods Eight patients underwent an arthroscopically assisted S-K procedure. All patients were diagnosed as DRUJ osteoarthritis (OA), including six primary DRUJ OA, one OA following a distal radius fracture, and one rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Arthroscopy was performed in neutral forearm rotation with vertical traction. The surface of the DRUJ was debrided through arthroscopy to expose the subchondral surface, and the DRUJ was fixed with a cannulated screw and Kirschner wire (K-wire) with zero or minus ulnar variance in the same posture. Bone graft was not performed.

Results Bone union was achieved at 2 to 3.5 months postoperatively. At an average of 17-month follow-up, the pain intensity on 10-point numerical rating scale (NRS) decreased from 10 preoperatively to 0.4 postoperatively, average range of pronation significantly improved from 77 degrees to 89 degrees, and average grip strength as a percentage of contralateral side improved from 76 to 104%.

Conclusion Satisfactory outcomes were achieved with the arthroscopically assisted S-K procedure. Advantages of this procedure included the ability to achieve union without bone grafting, preservation of the extensor mechanism integrity, and easy reduction of the ulnar head due to its wrist positioning. No major complications were encountered. Disadvantages included its required use of arthroscopic technique and potential contraindication for cases with severe deformity at the sigmoid notch.

Level of Evidence This is a Level IV, therapeutic study.



Publication History

Received: 14 June 2020

Accepted: 02 November 2020

Article published online:
05 January 2021

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