Eur J Pediatr Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1723035
Review Article

The Use of an Inanimate Simulation Model for the Correction of an Anorectal Malformation in the Training of Colorectal Pediatric Surgery

1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Radboudumc, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
,
Guus M. J. Bökkerink
2  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, The Netherlands
,
Marc A. Levitt
3  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
,
Karen A. Diefenbach
4  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, United States
,
Carlos A. Reck
5  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Wien, Austria
,
5  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Wien, Austria
,
Ivo de Blaauw
6  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Radboudumc, Nijmegen, Gelderland, The Netherlands
,
Sanne M.B.I. Botden
6  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Radboudumc, Nijmegen, Gelderland, The Netherlands
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.

Abstract

Introduction An anorectal malformation (ARM) is a congenital malformation that requires surgical correction. To acquire the skills needed to perform this complex procedure, an affordable simulation model has previously been developed and validated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the suitability of this ARM model (with perineal fistula) for training in hands-on workshops.

Materials and Methods The ARM model consists of a wooden casing with disposable perineal body. Participants in several international pediatric colorectal hands-on workshops in 2019 and 2020 were asked to participate. They were divided in a target group and an experienced group based on experience. All practiced the posterior sagittal anorectoplasty procedure on the model with multimodality guidance. Subsequently, statements on the suitability of the model for use during hands-on workshops were scored on a 5-point Likert scale.

Results A total of 80 participants were included (43 surgical specialists, 13 pediatric surgery fellows, and 25 residents). Nearly, all statements scored at least a mean of >4.0, all scored significantly better than a neutral opinion. The target group (n = 58) scored higher compared with the experienced group (n = 22) on “transferability of the skills to the clinical setting” (means 4.4 vs. 4.0, p = 0.038); however, the “suitability as a replacement for an animal model” scored significantly lower (means 3.6 vs. 3.9, p = 0.049). No other differences were found.

Conclusion This affordable ARM model was regarded a suitable model for training during preclinical hands-on workshops and could be used for the specified steps of the procedure.

Supplementary Material



Publication History

Received: 12 October 2020

Accepted: 29 December 2020

Publication Date:
10 February 2021 (online)

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