Semin Thromb Hemost 2021; 47(07): 775-786
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1729963
Review Article

Fibrin Network Porosity and Endo-/Exogenous Thrombin Cross-talk

Shu He
1  Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
2  Division of Coagulation Research, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
,
Håkan Wallén
1  Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
,
Charlotte Thålin
1  Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
,
Jan Svensson
1  Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
,
Margareta Blombäck
1  Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
2  Division of Coagulation Research, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
› Institutsangaben
Funding This study is supported by the Clas Groschinsky Memorial fund (org. nr. 802004-0195).

Abstract

The earliest assessment of fibrin network porosity used a liquid permeation system and confocal 3D microscopy, which was later replaced by scanning electron microscopy. Although the methods have extensively been applied in studies of health or disease, there remains debate on the choice of a proper clotting trigger. In this review, we assess published data and convey our opinions with regard to several issues. First, when the coagulation process is initiated by recombinant tissue factor (rTF) and phospholipids, the fibrin network porosity is regulated by the endogenous thrombin based on enzymatic activations of multiple coagulants. If purified thrombin (1.0 IU/mL) is employed as the clotting trigger, fibrin network porosity may be affected by exogenous thrombin, which directly polymerizes fibrinogen in plasma, and additionally by endogenous thrombin stemming from a “positive feedback loop” action of the added thrombin. Second, with use of either endogenous or exogenous thrombin, the concentration and clotting property of available fibrinogen both influence the fibrin network porosity. Third, in the assay systems in vitro, exogenous thrombin but not rTF-induced endogenous thrombin seems to be functional enough to activate factor XIII, which then contributes to a decrease in the fibrin network porosity. Fourth, fibrin network porosity determines the transport of fibrinolytic components into/through the clots and therefore serves as an indicator of the fibrinolysis potential in plasma.

Note

This review is dedicated to the memory of Professor Birger Blombäck (1926–2008) who was the first to set up the methods of determining fibrin network porosity.




Publikationsverlauf

Publikationsdatum:
12. Juli 2021 (online)

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