Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes 2019; 127(08): 497-504
DOI: 10.1055/s-0043-106443
Review
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Methylglyoxal and Advanced Glycation End Products in Patients with Diabetes – What We Know so Far and the Missing Links

Jan Benedikt Groener
1  Department Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
,
Dimitrios Oikonomou
1  Department Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
,
Ruan Cheko
1  Department Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
,
Zoltan Kender
1  Department Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
,
Johanna Zemva
1  Department Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
,
Lars Kihm
1  Department Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
,
Martina Muckenthaler
2  Molecular Medicine Partnership Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory and University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
,
Verena Peters
3  University Children’s Hospital, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
,
Thomas Fleming
1  Department Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
,
Stefan Kopf
1  Department Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
,
Peter P. Nawroth
1  Department Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 06 March 2017
revised 06 March 2017

accepted 17 March 2017

Publication Date:
13 April 2017 (online)

Abstract

Hyperglycemia explains the development of late diabetic complications in patients with diabetes type 1 and type 2 only partially. Most therapeutic efforts relying on intensive glucose control failed to decrease the absolute risk for complications by more than 10%, especially in patients with diabetes type 2. Therefore, alternative pathophysiological pathways have to be examined, in order to develop more individualized treatment options for patients with diabetes in the future. One such pathway might be the metabolism of dicarbonyls, among them methylglyoxal and the accumulation of advanced glycation end products. Here we review currently available epidemiological data on dicarbonyls and AGEs in association with human diabetes type 1 and type 2.