Osteologie 2024; 33(02): 132
DOI: 10.1055/s-0044-1782096
Abstracts
6. Posterbegehung 6

Effect of a calcium phosphate nanoparticle based bone adhesive on blood vessel formation and density in the chorioallantoic membrane

Katarina Vasic
1   University Medical Center, Department of Trauma Surgery, Orthopedics and Plastic Surgery, Goettingen
,
Kai Böker
1   University Medical Center, Department of Trauma Surgery, Orthopedics and Plastic Surgery, Goettingen
,
Benedikt Kruse
2   University of Duisburg-Essen, Inorganic Chemistry, Essen
,
Jörg Wilting
3   University Medical Center, Institut for Anatomy and Embriology, Goettingen
,
Arndt Schilling
1   University Medical Center, Department of Trauma Surgery, Orthopedics and Plastic Surgery, Goettingen
,
Matthias Epple
2   University of Duisburg-Essen, Inorganic Chemistry, Essen
,
Wolfgang Lehmann
1   University Medical Center, Department of Trauma Surgery, Orthopedics and Plastic Surgery, Goettingen
› Author Affiliations
 

Introduction: A biodegradable, biocompatible and easy to apply bone adhesive could change the current approach to treating bone fractures by providing fixation even to small bone fragments. Functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles are a promising starting point for such a functional bone adhesive. Blood vessel formation is an important step in the initial phase of the bone healing. As such, it should be unaltered in the presence of the bone adhesive. The aim of this project is to investigate the effect of the calcium phosphate nanoparticle based bone adhesive on the blood vessel formation.

Methods: The bone adhesive paste was prepared by mixing 2 wt% aqueous alginate solution with freeze-dried calcium phosphate-carboxymethylcellulose-silica nanoparticles (CaP/CMC/SiO2) in the mass ratio 3.6:1 ratio. This gave a pasty formulation. Fertile chicken eggs were incubated in a humidified environment at 37.5 °C for 5 days, with the window into the eggshell being made at day 3. At day 5, a 3mm long bone adhesive paste cylinder with 1mm diameter was placed on chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and eggs were incubated for additional 4 days. At day 9, implanted material was removed together with the surrounding tissue, fixed with 4% PFA, cryo-embedded and stored at 20 ⁰C. Histological sections were used for immunofluorescence staining with MEP21 (CD34 homolog) primary antibodies, a marker for chick blood endothelial cells.

Results: After 4 days incubation of the implant on the CAM, a dense net of the blood vessels was observed formed tightly around the implant. MEP21 was used in immuno-fluorescent staining to visualize blood vessels around the bone adhesive implant and check for the potential penetration of the blood vessels into the implant. Microscopic analysis of the immuno-fluorescent staining confirmed the formation of blood vessels around the implant, with no blood vessels observed inside the implant.

Discussion: Positive peri-implant angiogenesis was observed, indicating no obstruction by calcium phosphate nanoparticle-based bone adhesive. In further experiments with the chicken embryos, the effect of the bone adhesive on the bone formation will be investigated. Furthermore, the effect of the bone adhesive on osteoblast differentiation and osteoclast differentiation and resorption will be tested to ensure unimpaired bone healing in the fracture fixed with the bone adhesive.

Keywords: bone adhesive, blood vessels, chorioallantoic membrane

Korrespondenzadresse: Katarina Vasic, University Medical Center, Department of Trauma Surgery, Orthopedics and Plastic Surgery, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen, Germany, E-Mail: katarina.vasic@med.uni-goettingen.de



Publication History

Article published online:
13 March 2024

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