Facial plast Surg 2003; 19(4): 299-308
DOI: 10.1055/s-2004-815649
Copyright © 2003 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc., 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA. Tel.: +1(212) 584-4662

Revision Rhinoplasty

Thomas Romo III1,2,3,4 , Jonathan Sonne1 , Kyle S. Choe1 , Anthony P. Sclafani1,2,3
  • 1Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY
  • 2Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY
  • 3Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY
  • 4Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
22 January 2004 (online)

ABSTRACT

Revision rhinoplasty can be one of the most complicated procedures performed by the facial plastic surgeon. As septal cartilage is often not available in revision procedures, grafting material is often needed. This material can come in the form of autogenous bone and cartilage. Allografts also can be used, including mersilene, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, and porous high-density polyethylene (PHDPE). In this article, emphasis is placed on the senior author's method in evaluating candidates for revision rhinoplasty as well as techniques using PHDPE. In addition, the properties of the more commonly used allografts are described, including the advantages and disadvantages of using each material in revision rhinoplasty procedures. In comparing the various alloplastic materials available, it is shown that PHDPE has properties that make it an excellent implant for revision rhinoplasty.