Semin Speech Lang 2008; 29(2): 092-100
DOI: 10.1055/s-2008-1079123
© Thieme Medical Publishers

Early Intervention, AAC, and Transition to School for Young Children with Significant Spoken Communication Disorders and Their Families

Rose A. Sevcik1 , Andrea Barton-Hulsey1 , MaryAnn Romski1
  • 1Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia
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Publikationsverlauf

Publikationsdatum:
21. Juli 2008 (online)

ABSTRACT

This article presents an overview of the integration of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies into very early language intervention. Included is a brief discussion of the myths that exist about using AAC with very young children and the evidence against these myths. It also examines the transition to school for children who will use AAC. This examination includes issues that must be considered for a child's transition to school using AAC to be successful.

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Rose A Sevcik

Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA

eMail: rsevcik@gsu.edu