CC BY-NC 4.0 · Arch Plast Surg 2015; 42(06): 729-734
DOI: 10.5999/aps.2015.42.6.729
Original Article

Scar Revision Surgery: The Patient's Perspective

Benjamin H Miranda
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK
,
Anna Y Allan
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK
,
Daniel P Butler
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK
,
Paul D Cussons
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK
› Author Affiliations

Background Insufficient satisfaction outcome literature exists to assist consultations for scar revision surgery; such outcomes should reflect the patient's perspective. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate scar revision patient satisfaction outcomes, according to specified patient-selection criteria.

Methods Patients (250) were randomly selected for telephone contacting regarding scar revisions undertaken between 2007-2011. Visual analogue scores were obtained for scars pre- and post-revision surgery. Surgery selection criteria were; 'presence' of sufficient time for scar maturation prior to revision, technical issues during or wound complications from the initial procedure that contributed to poor scarring, and 'absence' of site-specific or patient factors that negatively influence outcomes. Patient demographics, scar pathogenesis (elective vs. trauma), underlying issue (functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic) and revision surgery details were also collected with the added use of a real-time, hospital database.

Results Telephone contacting was achieved for 211 patients (214 scar revisions). Satisfaction outcomes were '2% worse, 16% no change, and 82% better'; a distribution maintained between body sites and despite whether surgery was functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic. Better outcomes were reported by patients who sustained traumatic scars vs. those who sustained scars by elective procedures (91.80% vs. 77.78%, P=0.016) and by females vs. males (85.52% vs. 75.36%, P<0.05), particularly in the elective group where males (36.17%) were more likely to report no change or worse outcomes versus females (16.04%) (P<0.01).

Conclusions Successful scar revision outcomes may be achieved using careful patient selection. This study provides useful information for referring general practitioners, and patient-surgeon consultations, when planning scar revision.



Publication History

Received: 21 April 2015

Accepted: 06 July 2015

Article published online:
05 May 2022

© 2015. The Korean Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, permitting unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)

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