Int J Sports Med 2019; 40(05): 312-316
DOI: 10.1055/a-0835-6063
Training & Testing
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Medical Emergencies During a Half Marathon Race – The Influence of Weather

Eric Carlström
1  Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden
2  School of Business, Campus Vestfold, Borre, Norway
,
Mats Borjesson
3  Clinical Experimental Research Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Gunnar Palm
4  Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Amir Khorram-Manesh
5  Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, University of Gothenburg, Goteborg, Sweden
,
Fredrik Lindberg
4  Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Björn Holmer
4  Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Andreas Berner
6  Unit for EMS-coordination, Provider Governance and coordination, Head Office, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Per Örninge
6  Unit for EMS-coordination, Provider Governance and coordination, Head Office, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Hampus Luning
7  Department of Food, Nutrition and Sport Science and Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Finn Nilson
8  Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, Karlstads Universitet, Karlstad, Sweden
,
Carita Gelang
6  Unit for EMS-coordination, Provider Governance and coordination, Head Office, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Sofia Thorsson
4  Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted 07 January 2019

Publication Date:
11 March 2019 (online)

Abstract

The aim was to analyze the influence of weather conditions on medical emergencies in a half-marathon, specifically by evaluating its relation to the number of non-finishers, ambulance-required assistances, and collapses in need of ambulance as well as looking at the location of such emergencies on the race course. Seven years of data from the world’s largest half marathon were used. Meteorological data were obtained from a nearby weather station, and the Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET) index was used as a measure of general weather conditions. Of the 315,919 race starters, 104 runners out of the 140 ambulance-required assistances needed ambulance services due to collapses. Maximum air temperature and PET significantly co-variated with ambulance-required assistances, collapses, and non-finishers (R2=0.65–0.92; p=0.001–0.03). When air temperatures vary between 15–29°C, an increase of 1°C results in an increase of 2.5 (0.008/1000) ambulance-required assistances, 2.5 (0.008/1000) collapses (needing ambulance services), and 107 (0.34/1000) non-finishers. The results also indicate that when the daily maximum PET varies between 18–35°C, an increase of 1°C PET results in an increase of 1.8 collapses (0.006/1000) needing ambulance services and 66 non-finishers (0.21/1000).