Horm Metab Res 2019; 51(05): 309-314
DOI: 10.1055/a-0879-5122
Endocrine Care
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Pattern of Lipid Abnormalities Among South Asian Indians With Cushing’s Syndrome and the Short Term Impact of Surgical Correction of Hypercortisolism

Atul Dhingra
1  Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
Mohd Ashraf Ganie
1  Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
Pramila Dharmshaktu
1  Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
Semanti Chakraborty
1  Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
Viveka P. Jyotsna
1  Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
Nandita Gupta
1  Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 22 March 2018

accepted 12 March 2019

Publication Date:
09 May 2019 (online)

Abstract

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular events are one of the common causes of mortality in patients with Cushing’s syndrome (CS). Atherogenic dyslipidemia is more common among South Asian Indians as compared to other ethnicities and is likely to worsen among patients with CS. This retrospective study was done over 5 years at a single institute to evaluate the pattern of lipid abnormalities in subjects with CS and the changes in lipid parameters after surgical control of hypercortisolemia. The study was done in two parts. In the first part, records of patients with CS diagnosed over 3 years were retrospectively reviewed. Hormonal and metabolic parameters including fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post prandial plasma glucose (PPPG), HbA1c, serum lipids, serum cortisol and plasma ACTH were recorded. In the second part, lipid parameters were rechecked among patients who underwent surgery and a median follow up of 4±2 months after remission. Out of the 126 patients diagnosed with endogenous CS over 3 years, 100 patients were eligible for inclusion in the study. At baseline, sixty five (65%) patients had dyslipidemia as defined by the NCEP-ATPIII criteria. 47 out of 63 (74.6%) subjects achieved remission after surgical management of CS. 32 (68.1%) of these patients had dyslipidemia prior to surgery. After excluding 1 death, 26 of 46 (56.5%) subjects had dyslipidemia after the follow up period. Lipid abnormalities are common among South Asian Indian subjects with endogenous CS and the pattern persists in most of them, 3 months after surgical correction of hypercortisolism.