Z Orthop Unfall
DOI: 10.1055/a-0953-8955
Case Report/Fallbericht
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Open Ankle Dislocation without Associated Malleolar Fracture on a Trampoline. A Case Report

Article in several languages: English | deutsch
Paul Hagebusch
1  Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, BG Unfallklinik (Trauma Clinic) Frankfurt am Main
,
Oliver Neun
2  Department of Orthopaedic and Traumatological Foot Surgery, BG Unfallklinik (Trauma Clinic) Frankfurt am Main
,
Yves Gramlich
1  Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, BG Unfallklinik (Trauma Clinic) Frankfurt am Main
,
Uwe Schweigkofler
1  Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, BG Unfallklinik (Trauma Clinic) Frankfurt am Main
,
Reinhard Hoffmann
1  Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, BG Unfallklinik (Trauma Clinic) Frankfurt am Main
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
09 September 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Dislocation of the ankle without fracture is very uncommon. There are only few reports in the international literature. Up to now approximately 80 cases are published. The risk of hyperflexion and -inversion of the ankle seems high on a trampoline. A multiple of the jumperʼs body-weight projects delayed on the upper ankle joint while dipping in the trampoline-sheet. Reduction should be performed as fast as possible to ensure a good clinical outcome. Imaging via MRI and CT scan allows a detailed evaluation of the injury severity. The decision for further treatment should be based on the findings in the MRI and CT scans. Reconstructing the medial and lateral capsular ligaments can be necessary. With a consequent treatment algorithm a good functional outcome can be achieved. In our case we documented a post-traumatic AOFAS score of 87/100 six months after the injury without an instability of the upper or lower ankle joint. Propioreceptive reflex and pronator training as well as taping seem to be useful before and during trampoline sports.