Int J Sports Med
DOI: 10.1055/a-1408-4793
Training & Testing

Acute Physiological Response to Light- and Heavy-load Power-oriented Exercise in Older Adults

1  GENUD Toledo Research Group, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo, Spain
2  CIBER of Frailty and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain
,
1  GENUD Toledo Research Group, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo, Spain
2  CIBER of Frailty and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain
,
1  GENUD Toledo Research Group, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo, Spain
2  CIBER of Frailty and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain
3  Department of Geriatrics, Hospital Virgen del Valle, Complejo Hospitalario de Toledo, Toledo, Spain
,
4  Faculty of Physiotherapy and Nursing, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo, Spain
,
Aurora Maria Cruz-Santaella
3  Department of Geriatrics, Hospital Virgen del Valle, Complejo Hospitalario de Toledo, Toledo, Spain
,
2  CIBER of Frailty and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain
2  CIBER of Frailty and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain
,
5  Research Unit for Orthopaedic Sports Medicine and Injury Prevention, ISAG, University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Hall in Tirol, Austria
,
1  GENUD Toledo Research Group, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo, Spain
2  CIBER of Frailty and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain
› Author Affiliations
Funding: This work was supported by the Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad of the Government of Spain (DEP2015–69386-R and BES-2016–077199) (MINECO/FEDER, EU); the Biomedical Research Networking Center on Frailty and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES) and FEDER funds from the European Union (CB16/10/00477 and CB16/10/00456) and by the Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia of the Government of Spain (Red EXERNET DEP2005–00046).

Abstract

This study investigated the acute responses to volume-load-matched heavy-load (80% 1RM) versus light-load (40% 1RM) power-oriented resistance training sessions in well-functioning older adults. Using a randomized cross-over design, 15 volunteers completed each condition on a leg press. Neuromuscular (maximal isometric force and rate of force development) and functional performance (power during sit-to-stand test), lactate, and muscle damage biochemistry (creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and C-reactive protein serum concentration) were assessed pre- and post-exercise. Performance declines were found after heavy-load (Cohen’s d effect size (d); maximal isometric force=0.95 d; rate of force development=1.17 d; sit-to-stand power =0.38 d, all p<0.05) and light-load (maximal isometric force=0.45 d; rate of force development=0.9 d; sit-to-stand power=1.17 d, all p<0.05), while lactate concentration increased only after light-load (1.7 d, p=0.001). However, no differences were found between conditions (all p>0.05). Both conditions increased creatine kinase the day after exercise (marginal effect=0.75 d, p<0.001), but no other blood markers increased (all, p>0.05). Irrespective of the load used, power training induced non-clinically significant decreases in sit-to-stand performance, moderate declines in maximal isometric force, but pronounced decreases in the rate of force development. Furthermore, the metabolic stress and muscle damage were minor; both sessions were generally well tolerated by well-functioning older adults without previous experience in resistance training.



Publication History

Received: 23 November 2020

Accepted: 16 February 2021

Publication Date:
26 April 2021 (online)

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