Rofo
DOI: 10.1055/a-1463-3626
Statement

Statement of the German Roentgen Society, German Society of Neuroradiology, and Society of German-speaking Pediatric Radiologists on Requirements for the Performance and Reporting of MR Imaging Examinations Outside of Radiology

Article in several languages: English | deutsch
1  FOKUS Radiologie & Nuklearmedizin, Göttingen und Heilbad Heiligenstadt
,
2  Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Universitätsklinikum Frankfurt, Institut für Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Frankfurt am Main
,
3  Radiologische Allianz, Hamburg
,
4  Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU); Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Radiologisches Institut, Erlangen
,
Lars Benjamin Fritz
5  Rheinlandärzte, Willich
,
6  Radiologie München, München
,
Reinhard Loose
7  Klinikum Nürnberg, Institut für Medizinische Physik, Nürnberg
,
8  Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Lübeck
,
9  Universitätsklinikum Jena, Institut für Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Sektion Kinderradiologie, Jena
,
10  Universitätsklinikum rechts der Isar der TU München, Abteilung für Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, München
,
11  Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Medizinische Fakultät, Institut für Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Düsseldorf
,
Vorstand der Deutschen Röntgengesellschaft e. V. (DRG):
,
Vorstand der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neuroradiologie e. V. (DGNR):
,
Vorstand der Gesellschaft für Pädiatrische Radiologie e. V. (GPR):
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a very innovative, but at the same time complex and technically demanding diagnostic method in radiology. It plays an increasing role in high-quality and efficient patient management. Quality assurance in MRI is of utmost importance to avoid patient risks due to errors before and during the examination and when reporting the results. Therefore, MRI requires higher physician qualification and expertise than any other diagnostic imaging technique in medicine. This holds true for indication, performance of the examination itself, and in particular for image evaluation and writing of the report. In Germany, the radiologist is the only specialist who is systematically educated in all aspects of MRI during medical specialty training and who must document a specified, high number of examinations during this training. However, also non-radiologist physicians are increasingly endeavoring to conduct and bill MRI examinations on their own.

Method In this position statement, the following aspects of quality assurance for MRI examinations and billing by radiologists and non-radiologist physician specialists are examined scientifically: Requirements for specialist physician training, MRI risks and contraindications, radiation protection in the case of non-ionizing radiation, application of MR contrast agents, requirements regarding image quality, significance of image artifacts and incidental findings, image evaluation and reporting, interdisciplinary communication and multiple-eyes principle, and impact on healthcare system costs.

Conclusion The German Roentgen Society, German Society of Neuroradiology, and Society of German-speaking Pediatric Radiologists are critical with regard to MRI performance by non-radiologists in the interest of quality standards, patient welfare, and healthcare payers. The 24-month additional qualification in MRI as defined by the physician specialization regulations (Weiterbildungsordnung) through the German state medical associations (Landesärztekammern) is the only competence-based and quality-assured training program for board-certified specialist physicians outside radiology. This has to be required as the minimum standard for performance and reporting of MRI exams. Exclusively unstructured MRI training outside the physician specialization regulations has to be strictly rejected for reasons of patient safety. The performance and reporting of MRI examinations must be reserved for adequately trained and continuously educated specialist physicians.

Key Points:

  • MR imaging plays an increasing role due to its high diagnostic value and serves as the reference standard in many indications.

  • MRI is a complex technique that implies patient risks in case of inappropriare application or lack of expertise.

  • In Germany, the radiologist is the only specialist physician that has been systematically trained in all aspects of MRI such as indication, performance, and reporting of examinations in specified, high numbers.

  • The only competence-based and quality-assured MRI training program for specialist physicians outside radiology is the 24-month additional qualification as defined by the regulations through the German state medical associations.

  • In view of quality-assurance and patient safety, a finalized training program following the physician specialization regulations has to be required for the performance and reporting of MRI examinations.

Citation Format

  • Hunold P, Bucher AM, Sandstede J et al. Statement of the German Roentgen Society, German Society of Neuroradiology, and Society of German-speaking Pediatric Radiologists on Requirements for the Performance and Reporting of MR Imaging Examinations Outside of Radiology. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2021; DOI: 10.1055/a-1463-3626



Publication History

Received: 08 March 2021

Accepted: 16 March 2021

Publication Date:
08 April 2021 (online)

© 2021. Thieme. All rights reserved.

Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Rüdigerstraße 14, 70469 Stuttgart, Germany