Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes 2022; 130(05): 313-326
DOI: 10.1055/a-1756-4509
Review

New Paradigms for Familiar Diseases: Lessons Learned on Circulatory Bacterial Signatures in Cardiometabolic Diseases

Rima Chakaroun
1   Medical Department III - Endocrinology, Nephrology, Rheumatology, University of Leipzig Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany
2   Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine and Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Lucas Massier
1   Medical Department III - Endocrinology, Nephrology, Rheumatology, University of Leipzig Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany
3   Department of Medicine (H7), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
,
Niculina Musat
4   Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig, Germany
,
Peter Kovacs
1   Medical Department III - Endocrinology, Nephrology, Rheumatology, University of Leipzig Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany
5   Deutsches Zentrum für Diabetesforschung eV, Neuherberg, Germany
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Despite the strongly accumulating evidence for microbial signatures in metabolic tissues, including the blood, suggesting a novel paradigm for metabolic disease development, the notion of a core blood bacterial signature in health and disease remains a contentious concept. Recent studies clearly demonstrate that under a strict contamination-free environment, methods such as 16 S rRNA gene sequencing, fluorescence in-situ hybridization, transmission electron microscopy, and several more, allied with advanced bioinformatics tools, allow unambiguous detection and quantification of bacteria and bacterial DNA in human tissues. Bacterial load and compositional changes in the blood have been reported for numerous disease states, suggesting that bacteria and their components may partially induce systemic inflammation in cardiometabolic disease. This concept has been so far primarily based on measurements of surrogate parameters. It is now highly desirable to translate the current knowledge into diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic approaches.

This review addresses the potential clinical relevance of a blood bacterial signature pertinent to cardiometabolic diseases and outcomes and new avenues for translational approaches. It discusses pitfalls related to research in low bacterial biomass while proposing mitigation strategies for future research and application approaches.



Publication History

Received: 12 October 2021
Received: 15 December 2021

Accepted: 24 January 2022

Article published online:
23 March 2022

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