Int J Sports Med 2010; 31(9): 671-675
DOI: 10.1055/s-0029-1246140
Genetics & Molecular Biology

© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Exercise Effects on Methylation of ASC Gene

K. Nakajima1 , 7 , M. Takeoka1 , M. Mori2 , S. Hashimoto3 , A. Sakurai4 , H. Nose5 , K. Higuchi2 , N. Itano1 , M. Shiohara6 , T. Oh7 , S. Taniguchi1
  • 1Department of Molecular Oncology, Institute on Aging and Adaptation, Shinshu University Graduate School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan
  • 2Department of Aging Biology, Institute on Aging and Adaptation, Shinshu University Graduate School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan
  • 3Preventive Medical Center, Shinshu University Hospital, Matsumoto, Japan
  • 4Department of Medical Genetics, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan
  • 5Department of Sports Medical Sciences, Institute on Aging and Adaptation, Shinshu University Graduate School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan
  • 6Department of Pediatrics, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan
  • 7Department of Sports and Health Science, Faculty of Human Health Science, Matsumoto University, Matsumoto, Japan
Further Information

Publication History

accepted after revision December 06, 2009

Publication Date:
03 March 2010 (online)

Abstract

Chronic moderate exercise has been reported to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines. To analyze the molecular mechanisms by which training exerts these effects, the epigenetic influences of age and exercise on the ASC gene, which is responsible for IL-1β and IL-18 secretion, were investigated by ASC gene methylation. Further, the relationship between carcinogenesis and exercise, and methylation of the p15 tumor suppressive gene was also analyzed. High-intensity interval walking exercise, consisting of 3 min low-intensity walking at 40% of peak aerobic capacity followed by a 3 min high-intensity walking period above 70% of peak aerobic capacity, was continued for 6 months. Peripheral blood DNA extracts from young control (n=34), older control (n=153), and older exercise (n=230) groups were then analyzed by pyrosequencing for DNA methylation. Methylation of ASC decreased significantly with age (young control vs. older control, p<0.01), which is indicative of an age-dependent increase in ASC expression. Compared to the older control group, the degree of ASC methylation was higher in the older exercise group (older control vs. older exercise: p<0.01), and presumably lower ASC expression. Neither exercise nor age affected the methylation of the p15. In summary, chronic moderate exercise appears to attenuate the age-dependent decrease in ASC methylation, implying suppression of excess pro-inflammatory cytokines through reduction of ASC expression.

References

Correspondence

Dr. Shun'ichiro Taniguchi

Department of Molecular

Oncology, (Institute on Aging and Adaptation)

Shinshu University Graduate

School of Medicine

3-1-1 Asahi

390 – 8621 Matsumoto

Japan

Phone: +81/263-37-2679

Fax: +81/263-37-2724

Email: stangch@shinshu-u.ac.jp

    >