Int J Sports Med 2014; 35(08): 639-644
DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1354383
Physiology & Biochemistry
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

High-Intensity Exercise May Compromise Renal Morphology in Rats

V. A. Aparicio
1  Department of Physiology, School of Pharmacy and Faculty of Sport Sciences, and Institute of Nutrition and Food ­Technology, University of Granada, Spain
,
M. Tassi
2  Department of Pathologic Anatomy and Institute of Regenerative Biomedicine School of Medicine, University of Granada, Spain
,
E. Nebot
1  Department of Physiology, School of Pharmacy and Faculty of Sport Sciences, and Institute of Nutrition and Food ­Technology, University of Granada, Spain
,
D. Camiletti-Moirón
1  Department of Physiology, School of Pharmacy and Faculty of Sport Sciences, and Institute of Nutrition and Food ­Technology, University of Granada, Spain
,
E. Ortega
3  Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Spain
,
J. M. Porres
1  Department of Physiology, School of Pharmacy and Faculty of Sport Sciences, and Institute of Nutrition and Food ­Technology, University of Granada, Spain
,
P. Aranda
1  Department of Physiology, School of Pharmacy and Faculty of Sport Sciences, and Institute of Nutrition and Food ­Technology, University of Granada, Spain
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted after revision 02 August 2013

Publication Date:
14 January 2014 (online)

Abstract

We investigated the renal effects of a high-intensity exercise (HIE) program based on strength training. 20 Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 2 experimental groups performing HIE or control over 12 weeks. Urinary volume, pH, citrate and calcium, and plasma urea, total proteins, creatinine, albumin, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase (CK), calcium, magnesium, corticosterone and testosterone were measured. We also studied renal morphology with the Fibrosis HR® software. Plasma urea and CK concentrations were higher in the HIE compared to the control group (p<0.05), whereas plasma creatinine was lower (p<0.01). Plasma corticosterone was higher (p<0.05) and testosterone lower (p<0.01) in the HIE group. Except for the higher urinary volume found in the HIE group (p<0.05), no differences between groups were observed in the rest of urinary parameters analyzed. Renal interstitial connective tissue was ~30% higher in the HIE group (p<0.05). Glomerular tufts and mesangial areas were also higher in the HIE group (all, p<0.05). No differences between groups were observed in the glomerular area. Overall, HIE promoted a worse morphological renal profile that might be associated with a higher risk for incidence of kidney disease in the long-term. The stress induced by the type of exercise performed could be on the basis of this worse morphological renal status.