Int J Sports Med 2014; 35(12): 975-981
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1368724
Review
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Does Heat Acclimation Improve Exercise Capacity at Altitude? A Cross-tolerance Model

A. C. White
1   Health, Exercise and Sports Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, United States
,
R. M. Salgado
1   Health, Exercise and Sports Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, United States
,
S. Schneider
1   Health, Exercise and Sports Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, United States
,
J. A. Loeppky
1   Health, Exercise and Sports Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, United States
,
T. A. Astorino
2   Kinesiology, CSU-San Marcos, San Marcos, United States
,
C. M. Mermier
1   Health, Exercise and Sports Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted after revision 10 January 2014

Publication Date:
09 May 2014 (online)

Abstract

New approaches to inducing altitude acclimation in a relatively short timeframe are needed, as it is not practical for many soldiers and athletes to gain access to specialized training facilities. Acclimation to one environmental stressor could enhance adaptation to various other stressors in animals and humans. This phenomenon has been described as cross-tolerance and involves the activation of common protective pathways. The purpose of this review is to discuss possible mechanisms involved in the cross-tolerance between heat and hypoxia. Future data could potentially support the use of a cross-tolerance model as a means for military personnel to prepare for deployment to high-altitude environments, as well as for athletes competing at high altitude.