Facial plast Surg 2014; 30(02): 219-224
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1371896
Rapid Communication
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Platelet-Rich Fibrin Matrix (PRFM) for Androgenetic Alopecia

Anthony P. Sclafani
Division of Facial Plastic Surgery, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mt. Sinai, New York, New York
Department of Otolaryngology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
08 May 2014 (online)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM) treatment on androgenetic alopecia. Prospective cohort study of 15 (9 male and 6 female) subjects with androgenetic alopecia for at least 1 year who were treated with intradermal injections of autologous PRFM three times on a monthly basis. Hair density indices were measured in triplicate in the same area of the scalp before the treatment and 1, 2, 3 and 6 months after initial treatment. Hair density index (HDI) measurements were obtained and compared with pretreatment values for each subject. After a series of three intradermal PRFM injections, hair density indices increased significantly at 2 (47.4 ± 22.7%, p = 0.0031) and 3 (106.4 ± 56.9%, p = 0.0277, paired t-test) months after the initial treatment, and approached statistical significance at 6 months (75.1 ± 46.82%, p = 0.0606) after the initial treatment. Patients who achieved greater than 25% increase in HDI by 2 months after the initial treatment were more likely to have greater than 25% improvement at 6 months after the initial treatment (100 vs. 16.7%, p = 0.0476). Androgenetic alopecia affects a significant number of both men and women. A series of intradermal injections of autologous PRFM increased the HDI in patients with androgenetic alopecia at 2 and 3 months after initial treatment; this improvement approached statistical significance at 6 months after initiating treatment. Autologous PRFM injections may be a valuable treatment for androgenetic alopecia, particularly in cases with mild hair loss. The level of evidence is level 2.