Int J Sports Med 2016; 37(07): 570-576
DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1564170
Orthopedics & Biomechanics
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Mid-term Functional Outcome and Return to Sports after Proximal Hamstring Tendon Repair

G. H. Sandmann
1  Department of Trauma Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Munich, Munich, Germany
3  Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Munich, München, Germany
,
D. Hahn
2  Faculty of Sports and Health Science, Department of Biomechanics in Sports, Technische Universtaet Munich, Munich, Germany
4  Human Movement Science, Faculty of Sport Science, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany
,
M. Amereller
2  Faculty of Sports and Health Science, Department of Biomechanics in Sports, Technische Universtaet Munich, Munich, Germany
,
S. Siebenlist
1  Department of Trauma Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Munich, Munich, Germany
3  Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Munich, München, Germany
,
A. Schwirtz
2  Faculty of Sports and Health Science, Department of Biomechanics in Sports, Technische Universtaet Munich, Munich, Germany
,
A. B. Imhoff
3  Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Munich, München, Germany
,
P. U. Brucker
3  Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Munich, München, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted after revision 23 August 2015

Publication Date:
02 May 2016 (online)

Abstract

Proximal hamstring tendon ruptures are commonly associated with a significant loss of function, and operative treatment is recommended in active patients. The objective was to evaluate objective/subjective functional results and return to sports following proximal hamstring tendon repair in the mid-term follow-up. 16 repairs of proximal hamstring ruptures were performed in 15 patients (9 males, 6 females). The average age at the time of injury was 47 years (range, 21–66). All patients were clinically examined at a mean follow-up of 56 months (range, 24–112 months). Validated patient-oriented assessment scores focussing on sports activity including the Lysholm Score, Tegner Activity Score, UCLA Activity Score, adapted WOMAC Score, and the VAS were evaluated as well as the return to sports. Isokinetic strength of both legs was tested using a rotational dynamometer. The Lysholm, Tegner, UCLA Activity Score and the adapted WOMAC demonstrated predominantly a return to a preinjury activity level at follow-up. Functional measurements of the operated leg showed similar results to the uninjured leg in knee extension and flexion strength (p>0.094). In return to sports, no signficant (p>0.05) differences concerning types or frequency were noted. The surgical repair of proximal hamstring tendon ruptures leads to constantly good functional results in the mid-term follow-up, where patients demonstrate similar isokinetic results in the healthy leg.