Facial plast Surg 2017; 33(01): 052-057
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1593747
Review Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Titanium Mesh Nasal Repair without Nasal Lining

Joseph Zenga
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri
,
Katherine Kao
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri
,
Collin Chen
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri
,
Jennifer Gross
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri
,
Samuel Hahn
Department of Otolaryngology, ENT Associates at GBMC, Baltimore, Maryland
,
John J. Chi
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri
,
Gregory H. Branham
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
22 February 2017 (online)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to describe outcomes for patients who underwent titanium mesh reconstruction of full-thickness nasal defects without internal lining repair. This is a retrospective cohort study. Patients with through-and-through nasal defects were identified at a single academic institution between 2008 and 2016. Nasal reconstruction was performed with either titanium mesh and external skin reconstruction without repair of the intranasal lining or traditional three-layer closure. Five patients underwent titanium mesh reconstruction and 11 underwent traditional three-layer repair. Median follow-up was 11 months (range, 2–66 months). The only significant difference between groups was older age in patients undergoing titanium reconstruction (mean, 81 vs. 63 years; difference of 18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4–32 years). Defect extent including overall size and structures removed was similar between groups (p > 0.05). Paramedian forehead flap was the most common external reconstruction in both groups (100% for titanium mesh and 73% for three-layer closure). Time under anesthesia was significantly shorter for titanium mesh reconstruction (median, 119 vs. 314 minutes; difference of 195; 95% CI, 45–237). Estimated blood loss and length of hospital stay were similar between groups (p > 0.05). Complication rates were substantial although not significantly different, 40 and 36% in titanium and three-layer reconstruction, respectively (p > 0.05). All patients with complications after titanium reconstruction had prior or postoperative radiotherapy. Titanium mesh reconstruction of through-and-through nasal defects can successfully be performed without reconstruction of the intranasal lining, significantly decreasing operative times. This reconstructive technique may not be suitable for patients who undergo radiotherapy.