Thromb Haemost 1998; 80(02): 220-224
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1615176
Rapid Communication
Schattauer GmbH

Coagulation Factor V (Arg506 → Gln) Mutation and Early Saphenous Vein Graft Occlusion after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

Elisabeth Moor
1  Cardiology and Clinical Chemistry, and the Atherosclerosis Research Unit
,
Angela Silveira
3  King Gustaf V Research Institute, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
,
Hooft Ferdinand van’t
3  King Gustaf V Research Institute, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
,
Per Tornvall
1  Cardiology and Clinical Chemistry, and the Atherosclerosis Research Unit
,
Margareta Blombäck
2  Clinical Chemistry, and the Atherosclerosis Research Unit
,
Björn Wiman
2  Clinical Chemistry, and the Atherosclerosis Research Unit
,
Lars Rydén
1  Cardiology and Clinical Chemistry, and the Atherosclerosis Research Unit
,
Anders Hamsten
3  King Gustaf V Research Institute, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received 18 September 1997

Accepted after resubmission 09 April 1998

Publication Date:
08 December 2017 (online)

Summary

The factor V (Arg506→Gln) mutation confers an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis, whereas its role in saphenous vein graft closure after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) remains unclear. This study examined the anticoagulant response to activated protein C (APC ratio) in relation to the surgical trauma and the significance of the factor V Leiden mutation in determining postoperative thrombin generation and fibrin formation and the risk of early vein graft occlusion. A total of 108 men undergoing elective CABG for exertional angina pectoris (mean age 61.1 ± 8.7 years) were examined. The patency of saphenous vein grafts was studied at routine reangiography three months after CABG.

Of 100 patients who underwent reangiography, 23 had one or more occluded vein grafts at reangiography. Heterozygosity for the factor V (Arg506→Gln) mutation tended to be associated with early saphenous vein graft occlusion (5/11 carriers vs. 18/89 non-carriers with graft occlusion, व2 = 3.52, p = 0.06), whereas pre- and postoperative APC ratios did not. Pre- and postoperative determinations of prothrombin fragment 1+2, thrombin-antithrombin complexes and soluble fibrin levels did not differ between patients with and without the mutation.

Early saphenous vein graft occlusion after CABG could tentatively be added to deep vein thrombosis as a vascular complication that can be attributed to the factor V (Arg506→Gln) mutation.