Nervenheilkunde 2011; 30(09): 707-712
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1628415
Originalarbeit
Schattauer GmbH

Valproate- and comedication-induced change of weight associated with bipolar disorder

Article in several languages: deutsch | English
L. Hermle
1  Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Christophsbad Göppingen
,
M. Simon
1  Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Christophsbad Göppingen
,
K. Mey
1  Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Christophsbad Göppingen
,
W. Hewer
2  Klinik für Gerontopsychiatrie und -psychotherapie, Vizenz von Paul Hospital, Rottweil am Neckar
,
T. Fett-Hamperl
1  Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Christophsbad Göppingen
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

eingegangen am: 07 March 2011

angenommen am: 04 May 2011

Publication Date:
23 January 2018 (online)

Summary

Objective: Aim of the study was the prospective examination of change of body weight and various metabolic syndrome-associated parameters in patients with bipolar spectrum disorders under first-line treatment with Valproate and other defined psychotropic comedication. Methods: Over a nine month period, body mass index (BMI), waist hip ratio (WHR), relative adipose tissue and blood lep-tin levels were measured at regular intervals in 14 patients treated with valproate and defined psychopharmacological agents. Results: Accordant with former studies the fat-cell derived hormone leptin correlated significantly with BMI, WHR and with the percental adipose issue. Conclusions: Initially all patients displayed abdominal obesity with increased BMI and WHR. During the nine month course of first-time valproate treatment no overall significant weight gain was recorded in these patients. In particular, no correlation was found between valproate-medication and the weight parameters tested. Psychotropic drug-induced change of weight is a frequent adverse side effect during treatment of bipolar patients. Our findings suggest that in patients undergoing psychopharmacological treatment there is an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome-associated pathology of abdominal obesity. Further studies are required to corroborate the results.