Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2001; 14(01): 32-39
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1632670
Clinical Communications
Schattauer GmbH

An ovine model for total hip replacement: operative procedure and complications

J. R. Field
1  Department of Orthopedics and Trauma, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, and Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
,
H. Aberman
2  Howmedica Inc., Rutherford, New Jersey, USA
,
A. Carbone
1  Department of Orthopedics and Trauma, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, and Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
,
P. Sharpe
1  Department of Orthopedics and Trauma, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, and Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
,
N. Smith
3  Howmedica Inc., Staines, Middlesex, UK
,
D. Dunlop
4  Princess Margaret Rose Hospital, Edinburgh, Scotland
,
D. W. Howie
1  Department of Orthopedics and Trauma, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, and Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received 01 November 1999

Accepted 20 April 2000

Publication Date:
09 February 2018 (online)

Summary

A cranio-lateral curvilinear incision in the skin was centered over the greater trochanter. The subsequent approach to the acetabulum involved blunt dissection and avoided the need for significant muscular incision. The major post-operative complications encountered were fracturing of the proximal (2/37) and distal femur (4/37), caudal neuropathy (2/37) and septic femoral stem loosening (1/37). At two years post-operatively, the morbidity rate was 24% and the mortality rate 19%.

A regime of analgesia, involving constant infusion of xylazine, was developed and appeared very effective.

Thirty-seven mature Merino wethers were utilized for an evaluation of a new acetabular cup design using a modular cemented total hip replacement system. The ovine model for total hip replacement provided a reliable and manageable method for the evaluation of component design and tissue response.