Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2004; 17(01): 30-34
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1632797
Originel Research
Schattauer GmbH

Geometric analysis evaluating the effect of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy position on postoperative tibial plateau slope[*]

M. P. Kowaleski
1  Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA, USA
,
R. J. McCarthy
1  Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA, USA
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received 24 October 2002

Accepted 19 February 2003

Publication Date:
22 February 2018 (online)

Summary

The tibial plateau leveling osteotomy procedure is designed to neutralize cranial tibial thrust by precisely reducing tibial plateau slope. Despite accurate intraoperative measurement and proximal tibial plateau segment rotation, postoperative assessment of tibial plateau slope frequently reveals a measured angle differing from the expected postoperative angle of 5.0 degrees. The effect of osteotomy placement on postoperative tibial plateau slope was evaluated by analysing its effect on the points utilized in tibial plateau slope measurement. Four osteotomy placements, encompassing the point dividing the intercondylar tubercles and an osteotomy centred on this point, were evaluated. The effect of centreing the osteotomy distal to the intercondylar tubercles was more closely evaluated. Formulae to determine the distance the intercondylar tubercles move, the angular shift of the tibial long axis after proximal tibial plateau segment rotation, and the relation of the final and intended tibial plateau slope were derived. Osteotomy placement centred on the proximal tibial long axis point results in a lack of movement or angular shift of the tibial long axis, after proximal tibial plateau segment rotation. Other osteotomy placements result in movement of the intercondylar tubercles, tibial long axis shift, and deviation from the expected postoperative tibial plateau slope. Centreing the tibial plateau leveling osteotomy on the proximal tibial long axis point is the mathematically correct position.

* Presented in abstract form at the 29th Annual Conference of the Veterinary Orthopedic Society, Park City, Utah, USA