CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Laryngorhinootologie 2018; 97(S 02): S165
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1640282
Abstracts
Otologie: Otology
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

First results with a new, pressure-free, adhesive bone conduction hearing aid

V Dahm
1  Universitätsklinik für HNO, AKH-Wien, Wien, Österreich
,
WD Baumgartner
1  Universitätsklinik für HNO, AKH-Wien, Wien, Österreich
,
C Arnoldner
1  Universitätsklinik für HNO, AKH-Wien, Wien, Österreich
,
D Riss
1  Universitätsklinik für HNO, AKH-Wien, Wien, Österreich
› Institutsangaben
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Publikationsverlauf

Publikationsdatum:
18. April 2018 (online)

 

Introduction:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the hearing benefit, advantages and disadvantages with a new, non-implantable, pressure-free, adhesive bone conduction hearing aid in a series of patients.

Methods:

12 patients were included in the study at the ENT department of the Medical University of Vienna. All patients suffered from conductive hearing loss for at least three months. A sound field audiometry, Freiburg monosyllables word test and Oldenburg sentence test were performed. Additionally, sound quality (SSQ12) and quality of life (AQoL-8D) were assessed using questionnaires.

Results:

Analysis revealed an average aided threshold of 30.1 dB HL (± 7.0 SD) and an unaided threshold of 45.0 dB HL (± 6.8 SD), resulting in an average functional gain of 14.9 dB with a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001). Additionally, participants experienced about 30% gain in word recognition scores at 65 dB, SRT in quiet was 56.8 dB (± 6.1) and improved to 44.5 dB (± 6.4). Both the SSQ12 and the AQoL-8D showed a statistically significant improvement.

Conclusions:

In conclusion, this new, adhesive bone conduction hearing aid has a high patient satisfaction rate while causing no skin irritation or pain. The hearing gain was similar to other conventional bone conduction devices without the usual esthetical and pressure associated disadvantages.