CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Laryngorhinootologie 2018; 97(S 02): S233-S234
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1640521
Abstracts
Otologie: Otology
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Value of Dyna-CT for position control after cochlear implant surgery

J Priese
1  HNO-Klink, Jena
,
GF Volk
2  Klinik für Hals-Nasen-und Ohrenheilkunde, Universitätsklinik Jena, Jena
,
R Aschenbach
3  Institut für diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Universitätsklinik J, Jena
,
T Oberhoffner
4  Klinik für Hals-Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Universitätsklinik Jena, Jena
,
S Koscielny
2  Klinik für Hals-Nasen-und Ohrenheilkunde, Universitätsklinik Jena, Jena
,
O Guntinas-Lichius
4  Klinik für Hals-Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Universitätsklinik Jena, Jena
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
18 April 2018 (online)

 

Introduction:

Since about 30 years cochlear implants (CI) have been evolved to a standard procedure for auditory rehabilitation of deaf patients. The optimal position of the CI electrode is essential for a good surgical result. For postoperative position control are conventional x-ray diagnostics, computed tomography (CT) or digital volume tomography (DVT) available. A new method is Dyna-CT which uses a high resolution CT on flat detector angiography equipment. During the procedure the tube turns several times around the head of the patient. High resolution pictures for high contrast structures can be reconstructed out of the recovered data.

Methods:

In the last two years 59 patients obtained a position control after CI surgery with Dyna-CT.

Results:

The postoperative position control with Dyna-CT showed always a high picture quality and allowed a 3D illustration without further technology. With this procedure we could identify as well the depth as the correct localization of the electrode in the scala tympani. The average radiation exposure was about 50% less than with conventional CT.

Conclusion:

With the use of Dyna-CT we can achieve a reliable position control and determine the penetration depth of the CI with a comparatively low radiation exposure.