CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Laryngorhinootologie 2018; 97(S 02): S238-S239
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1640539
Abstracts
Otologie: Otology
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

MRI-based prediction of audiological outcome in elderly CI-users

F Raphael
1  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, HNO-Klinik, Berlin, Deutschland
,
HC Bauknecht
2  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Klinik für Neuroradiologie, Berlin
,
A Schubert
3  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, HNO-Klinik, Berlin
,
S Häußler
3  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, HNO-Klinik, Berlin
,
A Szczepek
3  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, HNO-Klinik, Berlin
,
S Gräbel
3  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, HNO-Klinik, Berlin
,
H Olze
3  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, HNO-Klinik, Berlin
,
S Knopke
3  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, HNO-Klinik, Berlin
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
18 April 2018 (online)

 

Background:

Neurophysiological resp. electrophysiological markers and methods for the assessment of rehabilitative success after cochlear implantation (CI) were described in the past. Prior surgery, useful clinical predictors are not known to assess audiological outcome after cochlear implantation (CI).

Objective:

The aim of the present study was to evaluate a neuroradiological dementia score as a predictive value for the rehabilitative outcome after CI.

Patients and methods:

63 patients with postlingual severe to profound hearing loss (60.4 ± 15.8, 20.6 – 88.9 years) and unilateral CI were studied between 03/2009 and 03/2014. In the follow-up period of at least 24 months, the neuroradiological Fazekas score (PVWM, DWM, total) was gathered by an experienced neuroradiologist in the preoperative MRI scan. Prospectively, the speech perception (Freiburg monosyllabic test; adaptive OLSA) was evaluated. This was followed by a statistical analysis with correlation analysis according to Spearman.

Results:

Postoperatively, we found a significant relationship between the Fazekas score PVWM and the speech perception in the OLSA in over 50 years old patients (> 50a: p < 0.01, rs =-0.525,> 70a: p < 0.05, rs =-0.523). After 24 months, this correlation did not persist any longer. Speech perception showed a significant improvement over the entire period.

Conclusion:

The prediction of postoperative speech perception by the Fazekas score appears possible. Measured by the Fazekas score, anatomical deficits appear to be compensated over a prolonged follow-up period. This may be an expression of neuroplasticity.