Thromb Haemost 1990; 63(03): 367-370
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1645048
Original Article
Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart

Awareness of High Blood Pressure Stimulates Platelet Release Reaction

Morten Rostrup
The Department of Internal Medicine, Ullevål Hospital, University of Oslo Medical School, Norway
,
Håvard Holth Mundal
The Department of Internal Medicine, Ullevål Hospital, University of Oslo Medical School, Norway
,
Sverre Erik Kjeldsen
The Department of Internal Medicine, Ullevål Hospital, University of Oslo Medical School, Norway
,
Knut Gjesdal
The Department of Internal Medicine, Ullevål Hospital, University of Oslo Medical School, Norway
,
Ivar Eide
The Department of Internal Medicine, Ullevål Hospital, University of Oslo Medical School, Norway
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received 08 January 1990

Accepted after revision 30 January 1990

Publication Date:
30 June 2018 (online)

Summary

The present study aimed at testing the hypothesis of a link between mental stress and blood platelet function. Twenty-nine 19-year-old men were recruited from the 98th percentile of mean blood pressure (116 mmHg) at a routine medical screening. They were not informed about their elevated blood pressures at the time of the screening. One year later they were randomized into two groups. Group 1 (n = 16) was exposed to mental stress by a letter informing them about their high blood pressure, while group 2 (n = 13) was sent a neutral letter. At an examination 2 weeks later, heart rate (p <0.05) and plasma adrenaline (p <0.05) responses to a cold pressor test were exaggerated in the informed group. The plasma beta-thromoglobulin (pTG) concentration was elevated in the informed group (p <0.05) as was mean blood pressure (p <0.05). (3TG correlated positively with hematocrit (r = 0.59, p <0.005) and mean blood pressure (r = 0.43, p <0.05), and negatively with plasma HDL (r = −0.61, p = 0.001). The study shows that awareness of hypertension induces a hyperadrenergic state which is associated with the platelet release reaction. Under these circumstances platelet release seems to be correlated to established coronary heart disease risk factors.