J Neurol Surg B 2019; 80(01): 023-030
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1661349
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Biomechanical Comparison of the Temporalis Muscle Fascia, the Fascia Lata, and the Dura Mater

Mirjana Pukšec
1  Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Vukovar General Hospital, Vukovar, Croatia
,
Damir Semenski
2  Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
,
Damir Ježek
3  Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
,
Mladen Brnčić
3  Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
,
Sven Karlović
3  Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
,
Antonia Jakovčević
4  Department of Pathology and Cytology, University Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
,
Goran Bosanac
3  Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
,
Martin Jurlina
5  Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

15 August 2017

11 May 2018

Publication Date:
19 June 2018 (online)

Abstract

The purpose of our research is to prove that elastic biomechanical characteristics of the temporalis muscle fascia are comparable to those of the fascia lata, which makes the temporalis muscle fascia adequate material for dural reconstruction in the region of the anterior cranial fossa. Fifteen fresh human cadavers, with age range from 33 to 83 years (median age: 64 years; mean age: 64.28 years), were included in the biomechanical study. Biomechanical stretching test with the comparison of elasticity among the tissues of the temporalis muscle fascia, the fascia lata, and the dura was performed. The samples were stretched up to the value of 6% of the total sample length and subsequently were further stretched to the maximum value of force. The value of extension at its elastic limit for the each sample was extrapolated from the force–extension curve and was 6.3% of the total sample length for the fascia lata (stress value of 14.61 MPa), 7.4% for the dura (stress value of 6.91 MPa), and 8% for the temporalis muscle fascia (stress value of 2.09 MPa). The dura and temporalis muscle fascia shared the same biomechanical behavior pattern up to the value of their elastic limit, just opposite to that of the fascia lata, which proved to be the stiffest among the three investigated tissues. There was a statistically significant difference in the extension of the samples at the value of the elastic limit for the fascia lata in comparison to the temporalis muscle fascia and the dura (p = 0.002; Kruskal–Wallis test). Beyond the value of elastic limit, the temporalis muscle fascia proved to be by far the most elastic tissue in comparison to the fascia lata and the dura. The value of extension at its maximum value of force for the each sample was extrapolated from the force–extension curve and was 9.9% of the sample's total length for the dura (stress value of 10.02 MPa), 11.2% for the fascia lata (stress value of 23.03 MPa), and 18.5% (stress value of 3.88 MPa) for the temporalis muscle fascia. There was a statistically significant difference in stress values at the maximum value of force between the dura and the temporalis muscle fascia (p = 0.001; Mann–Whitney U test) and between the dura and the fascia lata (p < 0.001; Mann–Whitney U test). Because of its elasticity and similarity in its mechanical behavior to the dura, the temporalis muscle fascia can be considered the most suitable tissue for dural reconstruction.